Find London Funeral Directors You Trust: Help Planning & Cost Cutting

Funeral Directors in London

London Residents: Protect Your Family & Cut Funeral Costs With A Local Funeral Director Near You!

London Funeral Directors

A funeral director is there for you while you are in mourning and somewhat less able of managing and arranging a funeral yourself.

Funeral Costs in London

Although funerals aren’t seen as cheap they are understood to happen, understandably, without warning.

London Funeral Plans

At present funerals are in fact difficult to pay for many families in London and one way to deal with this is through easy monthly funeral plans.

FREE Guide to Cutting Funeral Costs by Taking Advantage of Funeral Plans...

Mark, Funeral Guide London

Mark Brown Co-founder of FuneralGuide.co.uk

Finding A London Funeral Director You Can Trust

London Funeral Director

A Funeral Director has become the first port of call for many when a person dies. Grieving humans simply cannot switch off emotions and make the many calls and arrangements required to get all parts moving.

We fall apart having just lose someone very dear to us -at this point of time we usually call a person that can handle all the details on our behalf.

In addition, their duties include organising the event to ensure all relevant parties are brought together, speaking to authorities, completing the necessary paperwork, speaking to appropriate representatives from a church or cemetery, and arranging a Celebrant for the service. In a calm manner you will be asked a series of questions that will take only half an hour.

For instance, authorities need notifying, certificates are required for both the death and burial or cremation. You can use a Funeral Director for all faiths, they will simply make contact with the Priest or religious leader of the local Church, Synagogue, Mosque and make preparation.

How much does a Funeral in London cost?

Funeral Planning London

As death occurs unpredictably in most cases, the costs associated with funerals are commonly a stressor. If on the other hand costs are not an issue, another option could be a full blown ceremony, memorial and everything you would like.

Religion will have a bearing on each aspect you can personalise.

The fees you are paying for include completing a certificate of death, liaising with cemeteries and if required any religious people. Additionally, there’s flowers, pall bearers, transportation, obituary, professional Eulogy written, catering and hall hire.

Funeral director fees tend to be straightforward and typically do not exceed more than a few hundred pounds. Cremation will undoubtedly be cheaper than burial and you don’t need to opt for a lengthy Obituary if a Death Notice will suffice.

This variance depends on your desired extravagance in regards to your choice of furnishing and style, furthermore, you may also expect third party costs, which include both securing a plot for the burial as well as having the space dug up for the coffin or casket. So if cost is an issue, consider both cremation vs burial as well as the time and grieving process also.

Are Funeral Plans Available to all Londoners or do you have to be over a certain age?

In the modern era, many people now take the time to plan for their death as part of a range of financial products that they receive and take out during their life time. If you have investments or take out a mortgage with a bank. Depending on who you choose to go with, you can be between age 18 and 80+ to get a funeral plan.

A single person who rents a flat doesn’t get life insurance, why bother? It’s a different story when you’re married, have children, have a business and a mortgage as you care about the people you leave behind. A Funeral Plan is an easy way of paying for a funeral in instalments over a period of a year or multiple years.

Typically, this will mean monthly or annual payments until sufficient funding is achieved to cover the funeral costs. There is also a more comforting reason for getting a Funeral Plan and that’s the consideration of your immediate family. Can you Son or Daughter or Wife afford the costs -would it be easier on them and the grieving process if all way prepared for them? You could organise the entire funeral or simply leave family to choose hymns and prayers that will comfort them.

Will writing services - you should have one!

When a person dies a lot of a person’s affairs can be left unattended to. A Will and Testament is the legal document that aids another in dealing with those affairs. A person testifies their will through a legal written note, usually observed by a solicitor, that they wish such and such a person to receive their worldly belongings.

It essentially details who in your life gets what – or how much of something – and when. They are concrete documents in the eyes of the law but there are occasions when this Probate can be questioned in the courts and contested. State an Executor – the person will organise everything, the beneficiaries – names of the people you wish to receive your estate, list the assets and sign and have it witnessed.

Other Probate issues may arise after but at least you’ve done as much as you can to make the process easier for the bereaved. Other persons and names receiving other property or items as stated in the will are referred to as beneficiaries.

This maybe the sale or distribution of property, the settling of debts and bills and informing people of your passing. A Will and Testament is the safest way to ensure your wishes for your Estate are adhered to.

Choosing a London crematorium

Most of these locations are multi faith and grounds are consecrated as you would expect.

A Crematorium is a building which houses a reception area, can hold a congregation and provide a full religious funeral service just as you would expect from a Church. There also tend to be cemeteries on the same grounds. Furthermore, while crematoriums tend to possess some kind of religious affiliation, most are also willing to still accept any service.

If cremation is preferred, a funeral director will likely be able to direct you to the nearest crematorium for the appropriate service. Like that which may take place in a London church, the service may proceed with the same religious connotations, with the inclusion of readings, prayers, and hymns.

Coroners & Morticians

Every death in the UK has to be recorded – the next stage of a funeral or burial cannot continue with each document being presented. This person will then decide what the actual cause of the death was and if the scene and body should be preserved or the body can be released to the family for burial. A medical professional called a Coroner is called to adjudicate and perform a range of tests.

In the United Kingdom, the duties of a mortician – also known as a mortuary technician – involve attending to the body itself rather than any other aspects of the funeral planning process. They are tasked with preparing a body as per religious requests, beautifying and or making natural the person, and readying the body for viewing before a funeral takes place. They may beautify the body to ensure it is appropriate for viewing purposes, as well as generally take care of it – morticians may also be required to abide by any legal structures as guided by the coroner during this process.

Burial Sites in & around London?

As previously indicated, Hindus, Catholics and Christians and many other religions each have different requirements on how interment / burial of body or ashes should proceed. So religion may state which should be chosen. Cost may become an issue and Cremation tends to be cheaper by at least half when chosen.

Some families in the UK who have lived in an area for generations have family burial plots at their local Church and Graveyard – this allows people to return and pay respects annually or whenever they miss their Mum, Dad or significant other. People do tend to opt more for cremation these days, though this is the cheaper option this is not the main reason – before both occur, a body tends to rest in a coffin or casket so the same religious acts of viewing and service are carried out as normal.

Casket, Coffin or Urn?

London Burial sites

These are the vessels in which a body will find its final resting place.

An Urn is used to carry ashes and is vase shaped with closure. It can be buried or rest on a Mantelpiece. If you then wish to have ashes placed in an urn, there are also a varying degree of styles you can choose also.

Firstly, a casket is actually different to a coffin. What’s the difference? The distinctions are that a coffin has tapered ends that slope inwards at the head and the feet and have a six sided top, usually hinged and open entirely when offered for viewing. A casket however has only four sides and will have a split top, enabling one half of the casket to be open for viewing.

While both can be furnished, a casket tends to be more decorative with fancy handles. Both can be made of different materials and suitable for Humanist and Green burials -it is typical for a coffin to be used for cremation and both can be made from green materials for a Humanist or Green burial.

Cemeteries & Graveyards in London

London Cemeteries

Most religions prefer burial over cremation, some enable both, they can be burials that are marked as in Christianity or unmarked if a Humanist funeral.

In some towns and villages Churches have small Graveyards attached, in others and often connected to a Cemetery, there is a winding backdrop of open field that contains hundreds if not thousands of graves. More and more people are choosing cremation over burial. For a variety of reasons, costs vs not being buried underground.

Usually attached to a place of worship such as a church, it allows a memorial statue or headstone so that family can visit to hold vigil or simply catch up on what’s new.

London Obituaries

It is very difficult to inform people you don’t know existed in the deceased’s life, of their death. You could view their book of contacts in either book, computer or phone format but you don’t really know how close the people are. At National level, more can be alerted to the funeral – it’s a more flamboyant way of notifying of a death but also can be more personal than a death notice.

Instead of trying to figure who may wish to be notified, it is much easier to list an Obituary in several newspapers where the person grew up, lived long periods or in workplace magazines: Details you may include are place of birth, date of birth, place died and age -information about their career, personal achievements and characteristics and often the time, date and location of the funeral.

London Obituaries

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steve
"After my father passed without any arrangements, I had to sort everything out, it was difficult. I quickly decided that I didn’t want to leave my kids with that kind of burden. Now, I pay a small monthly amount and it’s such a relief..." -  Steve Bailey, Hertfordshire
Funeral Guide