When I’m Gone

A beautiful non-religious poem by Mosiah Lyman Hancock urging the narrator’s friend to only remember his virtues and achievements. Ironically, by acknowledging them, the poem deliberately draws attention to his flaws and failings, but hope that they will be forgiven. Above all, he does not want his loved ones to be sad that he has died. Hancock, an American who lived during the 19th century, was a member of the Church of Latter-Day Saints, but this poem is non-religious.

When I’m Gone

When I come to the end of my journey
And I travel my last weary mile
Just forget if you can, that I ever frowned
And remember only the smile 

Forget unkind words I have spoken
Remember some good I have done
Forget that I ever had heartache
And remember I've had loads of fun 

Forget that I've stumbled and blundered
And sometimes fell by the way
Remember I have fought some hard battles
And won, ere the close of the day 

Then forget to grieve for my going
I would not have you sad for a day
But in summer just gather some flowers
And remember the place where I lay 

And come in the shade of evening
When the sun paints the sky in the west
Stand for a few moments beside me
And remember only my best

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