Milton Pears (7 Jul 1934 - 19 Apr 2020)

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MiltonPrincess Alice Hospice

£600.00 + Gift Aid of £88.75
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Donate in memory of
MiltonRoy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

£100.00 + Gift Aid of £17.50
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Funeral Service

Location
North Eats Surrey Crematorium Lower Morden Lane Morden SM4 4NU
Funeral Director
Sherlock Funeral Service

In loving memory of Milton Pears who sadly passed away on 19th April 2020 aged 85 years.
Milton Pears was born 7 July 1934 to George an Muriel Pears in Villapuram, India. The third of 5 children.
He finished his education at Campion School, where he boarded for 5 years. He would often talk about his time at school and there is no doubt the Jesuits influenced his very strong catholic Faith. He would talk about the strict discipline, how he learnt to eat what he was given and the importance of a balanced diet. It was important that every meal included a vegetable preferably a green one. He enjoyed his sports particularly hockey and I believe he did quite well, representing the school. Although to be honest I am not sure what position he played. It is funny, I never thought to ask him this. I think Campion instilled in him a sense of community and how to play his role within in it. Dad had come from the railway community and followed in footsteps on the footplate. He completed his apprenticeship and became a driver.
Sadl yhe suffered a couple of fits and was medically unfit to continue to drive trains. He found a new role ensuring the smooth running of the AC express trains. He recently told me he felt embarrassed in this role because he took over from someone else who was pushed out to give him the job.
He met my Mum and they married in 1959. They made the decision to leave India and make a new home in England. They both felt that there were more opportunities for work and for a different life. Not so different as many young people would think. Their journey from India was quite something. They travelled by boat and had a few stop offs. The places they visited were amazing including sailing through the Suez canal, they saw many parts of Europe. Dad found that a sailors life was not for him and was often very sea sick. The final leg of the journey was a bit a disaster, they had to catch a train (gosh I wish dad was here to remind me of the details!) They had not been aware that it was 24 hour non stop and unlike the trains they had been used to in India there was no food service. They arrived in France very hungry and no currency. This experience lived with Dad and he was never ever in a position of being in a country without enough money!
The arrived in London and were greeted by Mum’s eldest brother who had found them somewhere to live and jobs in factories.
They were joined by other family and settled in Wimbledon, South London.
Dad did not find working in a factory satisfying and so embarked on a course of study and gained a HNC in business studies. By this time both myself and my brother had arrived. Me in 1961 and Jeff in 1963. I do remember living in the flat in Pelham Road and Dad coming home tired from his night school. But he did the right thing. Having achieved his HNC despite some not very helpful teachers he took on a role in the accounts department of the an electronics company called Phillips. He seemed to do well and with the introduction of computers his logic allowed him to develop spreadsheet and small programming capabilities. From his Campion days he brought with him the understanding that work was important and it was important to do it well. The many messages of condolences that I have received from his work colleagues have filled my heart with pride. The time he took to show new colleagues the ropes and friendships he forged in the work place were deep felt. Those of you who worked with him will be happy to know that 2 days before he left us he was still working on a spreadsheet! Complete with macros. Working for Phillips was a huge part of his life. The people he worked with and the job itself. He had so much pride in the people he worked with and their achievements. But he had a humble side that he never thought that his actions were a big thing. I know that this is not the case as colleagues have been able to tell me the first they met my Dad, and numerous occasions where Dad had been a bit of fixer.
In later years he had been meeting with Hilary, Paul & Helen now and again for lunch. After meeting with you he would tell me how much he had enjoyed the chatter and something I still find amazing is that he still was in awe of you all and would seek your advice for gardening and taxes! Thank you for bringing that joy to my dad.
Dad was not just about work, at his core was his family.
Having arrived in England in 1960, settled into work and finding a home I arrived in October 1961. Back in those days Mum’s would be taken into hospital and husband sent away and told to come back later. My Dad followed the instructions. When he came back to the hospital he came to find me, the nurse mis heard him and told him that there “were no Bears” on the ward! Luckily he did find Mum and myself. Jeff arrived in March 1963 and our family was complete. As well as our little family unit his brothers, sister, parents and the inlaws (mum’s family) were important to him. For a while the house contained his parents and youngest brother. When they moved away it was not unusual to come downstairs and find my Uncle Humphrey ( Mum’s youngest brother) and friends sleeping off the nights work or pleasure. Dad took it in stride the comings and goings of the young ones.
He and my mum made a home where everyone was welcome.
He was handy around the house, decorating, maintaining and gardening under mum’s direction. He tried his hardest to teach Jeff and myself our times tables. Not such an easy task! He tried to teach us as he had be taught the importance of good nutrition, also not so good as we both enjoyed a much sweeter tooth than Dad had been born with. Dad had high expectations of both Jeff and myself, he wanted us achieve better than he had. But Dad we could never better you.
As we grew up and left home. Mum retired, Dad retired and they started their travels again. First on the list was going back to India. 20 years after they left, they found it much changed. I think they were disappointed that neither Jeff nor myself showed any interest in joining them but not as disappointed as I feel now to have missed that opportunity.
Mum’s health started a downward spiral even before she retired but Dad carried on and made sure that she got the best care.
They celebrated 50 years being married with a party at our house in Epsom with family and friends in attendance in 2009. Mum at this stage was recovering from heart surgery and Lymphona.
With Jeff and I away from home, Mum and Dad reacquainted themselves with old friends from India.
Just after Mum died, I took Dad into a local telecoms shop.
I wanted him to have mobile that worked. The young man in the shop found Dad the right mobile and in signing the contract heard Dad say something about India. The young man started to tell Dad that his grandfather had been born and brought up in India and told him a few scant details. The young man looked at Dad and the disbelief on his face as dad said “ I went to school with your grandad!”
Dad joined the Kirby household and became part of our family unit. Although he retained the house in Morden he found his bed in our house “more to his liking.” He brought so much support and energy to our home. Using his skills at maintaining and gardening. Our friends became his friends an every event include an invitation to Milton. When our friends needed help with small building projects they would call to see if Dad was free to lend a hand.
We had a particualry busy evening on Thursday and Dad very quickly worked out what he could do to help. He learnt to cook. He made one of the best cottage pies ever. Mum must be so cross, that her lifetime switching on the kettle was the only skill he possessed in the kitchen department. Having mastered the cottage pie he tried his hand at stir fries, fajitas and curries. Just goes to prove, it is never too late to learn.
Before Mum left us, she had kept telling dad to see the doctor about his cough. After she left, one of the first things I did was to take him to have it checked out. Over the years there wer numerous check and numerous thoughtful suggestions; such as keep of the spicey food!
February this year we did some gardening with dad and took down some trees. WE could see dad struggle and for the first ever time he just disappeared and we found him looking through the newspaper in his chair. The following day he compained of chest pains and Liam took him A & E. The coronavirus was in the news and there was debate as to whether the UK should lockdown. Dad was thoroughly checked over and had an xray and CT scan and kept in over night. The shock of the scan result showing a rather large tumour in the left lung and hiding behind the heart. It must have been there undetected for years. Our family gathered as the result of the biopsy did indeed confirm lung cancer at stage 4. The hospital was gearing up for patients with the virus and so discharged Dad into my care in our home in Epsom. We had 3 cosy weeks with him and with the support of the Princess Alice Hospice team. They arranged care assistants and some aids to help him continue to walk around the home. We had a stair lift installed so that he could sleep comfortably in his bed upstairs.
The cough got worse, Dad lost all appetite and could not face food; he lost so much weight and on 19 April at just before 1 am he left us. He is at peace now with Mum his most loved brother Wally and ofcourse his parents.
This is some of my story of Dad – I would love to hear yours.- Louise

Rachel Buckle donated in memory of Milton

So sorry to read about Milton. Although it is over 30 years since I worked with him at Philips, I have never forgotten what a kind and gentle person he was and how he generously shared his knowledge. He also had a great sense of fun. RIP.

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  • Hello Rachel. Thank you so much for your kind words. It means so much to me to know how he touched the lives of the people he worked with. Work was very important to him. You were all his extended family.

    Posted by Louise on 17/07/2020 Report abuse
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Colin Garvey donated £50 in memory of Milton

It was a pleasure to have known Milton for so long and we miss him terribly. We were sorry we couldn't be there to say our goodbyes and pay our respects.

The Garvey Family

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Pauline Pears donated £25 in memory of Milton
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Sally Carroll donated £100 in memory of Milton

In memory of a great man. Xx

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Daniel Clarke donated £50 in memory of Milton

I only have fond memories of Uncle Milton. There were many happy visits he made to Grandad Wally's and he was always so cheerful & kind at the big family events. When Grandad was ill that Milton regularly called him on Skype which was something Grandad always enjoyed. They also laughed about how Wally had always been the sporty one but at this point Milton was the one running around still playing badminton. Rest in peace Uncle Milton

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  • Thank you Daniel.

    Posted by Louise on 25/06/2020 Report abuse
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Beth Clarke donated £20 in memory of Milton

I will always remember Milton with such fondness. He always had a kind word and a funny story to share. I will never forget the times he came and stayed at Grandad Wally's. Rest in Peace.
Beth xxx

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  • Thank you Beth.

    Posted by Louise on 25/06/2020 Report abuse
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Duncan and Flo Pears posted a picture
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Duncan and Flo Pears posted a picture

Happy Times!

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Duncan and Flo Pears donated in memory of Milton

Happy Times!

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  • Thank you Uncle Duncan and Aunty Flo.

    Posted by Louise on 23/06/2020 Report abuse
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Duncan and Flo Pears wrote

Heartfelt sorrow on the loss of a dear and most caring brother who was always ready to help others. He will be sadly missed by us. May he rest in peace..Duncan and Flo.

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Audrey Higgins donated £27.15 in memory of Milton

Uncle Milton, The best uncle ever! May you rest in Peace. xx ( Audrey, Peter and girls)

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Christine Anderson donated £44.34 in memory of Milton

Rest In Peace dear Milton.

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Linda Glenn donated £30 in memory of Milton

I feel so honoured to have had the opportunity to know Milton. A warm hearted, caring and a true gentleman. So sadly missed. Rest in peace.

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Marina Leslie wrote

Lovely memories of Milton having been introduced to him July 2019 at my son-in-law’s retirement party.
Donation to Princess Alice Hospice in his memory

From Marina Leslie and family

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Marina Leslie donated £20 in memory of Milton

Lovely memories of Milton having been introduced to him July 2019 at my son-in-law’s retirement party.

From Marina Leslie and family

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Noeleen Gould donated £30 in memory of Milton

Fond memories of a kind, warm-hearted gentleman. We will miss Milton dearly.
From Alan, Noeleen and family

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Richard and Nikki Payne donated £50 in memory of Milton

In memory of a great brother in law to my parents and wonderful kind Uncle. So supportive to us when my parents died.

Love
Richard and Nikki

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Simon Pears donated £20 in memory of Milton

Rest In peace Uncle Milton x

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Simon Pears donated £50 in memory of Milton

The story of your Dad is fantastic, and I am guilty of not knowing so much of this already. He gave me so much support when my own Dad passed away, and he spent so many hours at the hospital with my Dad in his final days. Completely selfless in his approach. Always had time for others and will always be remembered. I have so many memories of the nights my Dad would take me to your parents house in Morden, for a video night, when your Dad was showing off his latest Phillips Video recorder and Jasper bouncing around. I remember plenty of food always being available, which I took full advantage of and will always treasure the warmth and kindness your parents showed to everyone they met. Rest In Peace Uncle Milton x

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  • Yes Simon, so many memories created. So many more stories to share. xx

    Posted by Louise on 19/06/2020 Report abuse
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Sten Pears donated £89.34 in memory of Milton

My Dearest Brother Milton, May you Rest in Peace

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