Virtue Immortal

This poem by 17th century poet and priest George Herbert is appropriate for funerals or memorial services, especially religious ceremonies. The meaning of the poem is a celebration of how the memories of people who have died live on in remembrance of their virtue by family and friends who loved them.

Virtue Immortal

Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright,
The bridall of the earth and skie;
The dew shall weep thy fall to-night;
For thou must die. 

Sweet Rose, whose hue angrie and brave
Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye,
Thy root is ever in its grave,
And all must die. 

Sweet Spring, full of sweet dayes and roses,
A box where sweets compacted lie,
Thy musick shows ye have your closes,
And all must die. 

Onely a sweet and vertuous soul,
Like seasoned timber, never gives;
But, though the whole world, turn to coal,
Then chiefly lives.

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