Ealing Funeral Directors: How to find the best for your needs?

Funeral Directors in Ealing

Ealing Residents: Let us put you in touch with our recommended local funeral director, funeral costs & planning today!

Ealing Funeral Directors

When someone dies and there is a lot of grief to overcome a funeral director is there to help you make funeral arrangements.

Funeral Costs in Ealing

Funerals are widely seen as expensive but necessary although they can sometimes come at the worst moment.

Ealing Funeral Plans

Now that funerals are becoming more difficult to afford, pre paid funerals are one way to effectively deal with the high costs.

What you need to know about funeral directors, funeral plans, costs, and more...

Mark Brown Co-founder of FuneralGuide.co.uk

How to find a trustworthy funeral director in the local Ealing area (in West London)

I am very sure that hundreds of thousands of people each year would find it enormously difficult to organise a funeral if it wasn’t for Funeral Directors. Offering advice and organising a celebrant no matter which religion you hold faith in.

Whether it is organising the Ealing Church funeral service and cemetery details, speaking to relevant authorities, or arranging a celebrant.

The Funeral Director: As suggested, they will direct the funeral from start to finish. Arranging the Death Certificate, receiving permissions for burial and plot, and putting together the format for the Ealing funeral service itself.

They are not simply there to cater for a single religion and they do make arranging a funeral the easiest thing to do when in reality it is very hard at a time of grieving. Organising the details of choosing a casket, picking flower arrangements, and issuing a public death notice are tasks the funeral director may also be able to take on in order to ease the planning process for loved ones.

How much does a Funeral in Ealing cost?

When the Funeral Director visits to reassure and comfort you in your time of need, he will introduce you to the ways of how a funeral service is put together. If on the other hand costs are not an issue, another option could be a full blown ceremony, memorial and everything you would like.

A simple breakdown can see you pay a fee for the Funeral Director’s time and expertise, a charge for a Death Notice and paperwork for burial or cremations.

But for the most part, a standard funeral will involve the cost of the Funeral Director’s arrangement fees, the cost of a Celebrant and the person delivering the service, the hire of Religious venue, cost of cremation or burial plot and the choice of casket, coffin and or urn. The primary costs you will want to ready yourself for, however, include those for the funeral director, the collective primary costs of the funeral itself – including the coffin and burial – as well as any local Ealing authority fees involved.

The price point of a coffin or casket can be from around £200 – £3,000+ it all depends on what you desire for your loved one to be sent off in. There are also Cremation costs or for digging in a Ealing burial plot as well as renting the plot itself.

And it’s worth noting that using a Funeral Director is probably going to be cheaper than trying to organise each aspect yourself. Generally speaking, cremation is cheaper than burial, in any case you should be shown costs upfront so you can make the best decision for you.

Ealing locals enquiring about funeral plans - what are the main benefits?

I know what most people think when someone suggest they organise their own funeral. You will either pay a lump sum or a series of payments over many years.

If you do not have a large estate that is debt free when you pass, relatives may struggle when it comes to paying for your funeral. Within the will, you will be instructing your family or relatives the ability to pay for your funeral from your estate or pre-funded through a pre paid funeral plan.

This is an arrangement made with a funeral plan company that fixes costs during the year you started the plan. You can contribute payments monthly or annually until a funeral is paid for. While it is possible for a funeral to be paid for from your estate, once it clears probate, there is no guarantee that there will be enough money.

Paying for a funeral in advance protects your family from having to find the cost after you have died and lessens the stress at a time of grieving. Paying in advance by ten or fifteen years can also save thousands of pounds.

Your Will & Testament...

A Will and Testament serves as one of the most significant documents in funeral proceedings as a legal document able to aid in any affairs you may have left unattended during your lifetime. When you die your life on Planet Earth is over but the issue of your Estate – personal belongings, property, assets and investments – that is something very much on the agenda. These properties may include investments, cash in your accounts, as well as personal items such as jewellery, furniture, or any cars you may own.

If a person doesn’t have property or a loved one, they may not care for a will, but many opt for at least a simple Will to ensure loved ones are catered for and the process is made more simple if they suddenly die. They are concrete documents in the eyes of the law but there are occasions when this Probate can be questioned in the courts and contested. Family arguments, was the person sane at the time of writing, is it real, is the estate being handled correctly?

Other Probate issues may arise after but at least you’ve done as much as you can to make the process easier for the bereaved. Others names and to receive items will be termed beneficiaries.

A will may be opened upon the death of an individual or may be enacted as a Living Will under circumstances where the individual does not have control over themselves. All in all, creating a will is advised for all persons of any age, particularly if one has extensive family or mortgage, as this can be accomplished free of charge online or through your bank.

Choosing a crematorium in Ealing?

A Crematorium is similar to a Church in that it has seats for the congregation, an elevated stage for a celebrant but also includes a Catafalque which will display the coffin or casket until it moves beyond a curtain and the body is cremated.

In addition, crematoriums contain what is known as a Catafalque, which is able to display a casket or coffin until it is moved behind a curtain whereby it will be cremated. There also tend to be cemeteries on the same grounds. Furthermore, while crematoriums tend to possess some kind of religious affiliation, most are also willing to still accept any service.

The service, much like in a Church, can proceed with the same religious connotations, with a Celebrant, readings, prayers and hymns sung.

The Coroner

If a person’s death cannot be explained, the Coroner will decide the cause and make further investigation until a decision has been arrived at. Therefore if a death occurs and a Police Doctor or Hospital Doctor if natural death, cannot ascertain a cause of death, the Coroner is caused. It may not mean there has been a crime committed, however further investigation may be required by a forensic professional and one that can perform an autopsy if required.

The Mortician

In the United Kingdom, the duties of a mortician – also known as a mortuary technician – involve attending to the body itself rather than any other aspects of the funeral planning process. Their duties involve attending to the embalming procedure and otherwise preparing the deceased for the funeral. As well as assisting with legal cases as directed by a Coroner, the body will most likely be embalmed too.

Burial Sites in West London local to Ealing?

The method of interment chosen will be decided upon personal preference or as guided by the faith the deceased believed in – some religions allow cremation others only allow cremation and some only burial. If cost is a concern, cremation tends to be the less expensive option, though certain religions may designate preferences for particular services.

It may ban the practice of cremation or burial or may allow both. People do tend to opt more for cremation these days, though this is the cheaper option this is not the main reason – before both occur, a body tends to rest in a coffin or casket so the same religious acts of viewing and service are carried out as normal.

Choosing the Vessel: Casket, Coffin or Urn?

Every religion has different requirements for a funeral and they may or may not permit cremation or might insist upon cremation over burial.

An Urn is used to carry ashes and is vase shaped with closure. It can be buried or rest on a Mantelpiece. Caskets and Coffins are similar in that they are both built to contain the deceased.

However a casket is rectangular and often has split top for viewing and a coffin has tapered ends and six sides to the top. A coffin has six sides with the tapered angle at each end and tend to have one single top. Many people ask what the difference is between a coffin and a casket – the former is the enclosure that has the tapered ends and six sided top, with a hinged whole cover.

Both casket and coffin can be used for burial and cremation: The exception being that all furnishings must be wooden or cardboard, any elaborate handles or designs should be for burials only. Using any kind of materials and the cost will be the difference.

Cemeteries & Graveyards in Ealing

These of usually the grounds of a Church or religion building of faith, they will be the final resting place of the deceased.

It may also be personal preference to choose a grave rather than other means. For instance if there is a family plot or where loved ones and parters which to be buried together.

However, they can be good for the bereaved to visit in the coming months and years and say Goodbye, the grieving process is not as short as it is for others, often lasting years.

Ealing Obituaries

If you’ve ever flicked through all the pages of a Newspaper you’ll have find a small section buried in the classifieds which is used to announce Births, Deaths and Marriages.

At National level, more can be alerted to the funeral – it’s a more flamboyant way of notifying of a death but also can be more personal than a death notice.

Instead of trying to figure who may wish to be notified, it is much easier to list an Obituary in several newspapers where the person grew up, lived long periods or in workplace magazines: Details you may include are place of birth, date of birth, place died and age -information about their career, personal achievements and characteristics and often the time, date and location of the funeral.

Do you live in Ealing, West London? If so, you may be able to lock in funeral prices today...

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"After my father passed without any arrangements, I had to sort everything out, it was difficult. I quickly decided that I didn’t want to leave my kids with that kind of burden. Now, I pay a small monthly amount and it’s such a relief..." -  Steve Bailey, Hertfordshire
Funeral Guide